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SOVER^ME^rr DOCUMEMTSj 
BOSTOM PmUC U8RARY I 



THE CCMHONWEALIH OF MASSACHUSETIS 
DEPARliENT OF EDUCATION 



Dr* Ovren Bo Kieman, Commissioner 



ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 

DIVISION OF BtaGRAEON AND AlERICANIZA HON 

For the Year Ending Jime 30, I96I 



'4 ^"^ 



f! 



BOARD 



of 



the 



DIVISION OF B1MIGRATI0N AMD AMERIC/iNIZAZEON 



jfenn Expires 

1962 
1963 
I96I1 
1961; 
1962 
1963 



Miss Alice YU O'Connor, Chairman 

Mre Peter Arlos 

Mrs, Marian Bullen 

MrSo Clementina Langone 

MTo Renato C* Nunes 

Mrs» Helen Sutton 



SUPERVISOR OF SOCIAL SERVICE 



MrSo Ifeofilia K, Tattan 



DISTRICT AGENTS 



Mr, Daniel J, Donahue 
Mr© Andrew Vf, Ansara 
Mri John A, Mclnnes 
Mr, Edmund Be Meduski 



* 



Fall River Office 
Lawrence Office 
Springfield Office 
Worcester Office 



ANNUAL REPORT 

for the Year Ending June 30, 19 6 1 

for the 

DIVISION OF ]1MIGRATI0N AND AMERICANIZATION 

of the 
DEPARlffiNT OF EDUCATION 

The year which closed June 30, I96I was the forty-first year of the work of 
the Division "of IDnmigration and /unericanization as a part of the State Department 
of Education^ However, the State work for immigrants and those of foreign origin 
residents in the Coramonv/ealth began in July, 1917 v^rhen the Bureau of Immigration 
was established so that for forty-four years the Commonwealth has had a particular 
interest in the foreign born within its borders o 

The duties of the Division under the present lav/. Chapter I1O9 of the Acts of 
1939 are as follows : 

"Ihe Division of Hjumigration and Americanization shall 
employ such methods consistent vrith law, as in its 
judgment, will tend to bring into sympathetic and 
mutually helpful relations the Commonwealth and its 
residents of foreign origin, protect immigrants from 
exploitation and abuser stimulate their acquisition 
and mastery of Eng3i.sh| develop their understanding 
of American goveinment, institutions and ideals and 
generally promote their assimilation and naturaliza- 
tion" «, 

Ihe Division recorded h^r)h26 services to clients in the past yearo Of this 
nmnbor, 27,703 were Usted for the Boston Office j 3,83l| for the Fall River Office | 
h,3h2 for the Lawrence Office, 3,988 for Springfield and 5^559 i'or Worcestero 

NATIONALITY /iND EIHI^IC BACKGROUND 

The Italian bom clients, of whom we recorded services of 9,l6I|., were the* 
greatest number served by the offices and this has been so for many years past» 
United States born persons with ^,9kl were next because many Ibited States born 
sponsor spouses, 'parents in petitions and many make affidavits of support for 
relatives abroado Canadians with 5,179 vrere next and reflects the Canadian born 
population in this vicinityo Portuguese'v/ith 3,231 services, with the largest 
number serviced by our Fall River Office, shows the larger colony of Portuguese 
bom persons' still in that vicinityj Polish bom clients, of whom we serviced 
2,2675 Irish^ "2,27ii and Greek born to the number of 2,068 were in the group of the 
higher numbero It is interesting to note that reflection of the atmostphere of 
times when we 'have an increase in calls for services for persons in Central and 
South Amcilca, vihom we have assisted in changing status » Because of the possibi- 
lity of change of status, a number of Central and South American visitors were 
assisted to change to permanent residents© 



- 1 - 



;JLIEN IM} IS IRA HON 

Ihe 1961 Alien Rfegistration shows that 129,082' aliens filed annual Reports, 
an increase of some 2,000 over last year. No doubt, it reflects the 11,9^3 
immigrants admitted to the State of Massachusetts in I96O. The total population 
of Massachusetts for the I96O report is given as 5,1^4-8,578 - an increase of over 
1^58,061; over the last report of 19 50, 

NATIONALITIES REGISTERED iS ALIENS I96I 

WiSSACHUSETIS - TOT^lL 129,082 

Nationality Total 

Canada 30,2714 

Italy l6}9h$ 

Portugal 12,992 

Itoited Kingdom 10,959 

Poland 8,3l|6 

Ireland 7,096 

Germany 5,78l 

Greece 3,859 

lithuania 3,758 

U.SoS^R, 2,795 

etc. 

Tie i960 Federal Immigration Report lists the Nationality of the 11,953 ijnmi- 
grants to Massachusetts as follows: 

GeiTnany 93^ 

Ireland 855 

Italy 805 

Poland 300 

United Kingdom 1,114-3 

China 2.21 

Japan IO8 

Canada 2 629 

Mexico 26 

Cuba Y2 

All Other il 959 

Total all Countries 11.9S3 

ITOxRK OF IHE DIVISION 

^Our services are divided into four major categories - giving information to 
inquirers generally on some phase of citizenship, immigration, travel or adjust- 
ment of the newcomer in the United States, Now laws bring inquirers with hopes 
of relatives able to come to the United States, Vi"e account for 20,597 of our 
services in this category, Bie Division has assisted 10,li9U clients in execution 
of the various foms necessary in application for citizenship, copies of lost 



- 2 - 



naturalization records, alien registration cards, alien registration reports, as 
well as execution of necessary petitions required under the iirrniLgration procedure, 
2,917 affidavits of support were executed for persons sending for persons to come 
to the mited States. 86 persons traveled on Certificates of Identity v^ich the 
Division executed since they were unable to get any other travel document. 

Our vforkers translated some 1,619 documents needed in petitions to send for 
relatives and in cases of adjustment of status in the United States, as well as 
giving this service to several public and private social agencies* Vfe assisted 
It.70 persons to change status of which 219 of these requiired representation of our 
social workers at the hearing at the United States Immigration Service, Tcie 
others vrere for Canadians or other persons who had to depart from the United States 
to get their visas, Iluch correspondence and detail is required in this procedure. 
Ihe Boston Office had the majority of this phase of the work. 7,789 letters had 
to be written on cases « 3,060 new arrivals to the United States either wrote us 
or came in for infonnation on various phases of assimilation to the l&iitod States. 

VJELCOMIMG THE NFJCOlffiR 

This Division continues to send welcome letters to persons destined to this 
state from abroad. Ihe letter of vrolcomo infonns the newcomer of the services of 
the offices to help him in becoming assimilated to Hfe in the United States. Many 
of the replies request information about schools and educational opportunities, as 
well as inform.ation on citizenship and reunion of relatives from abroad. In the 
past year, it was noted that job opportunities for the newcomer vrere not as plenti- 
ful© Inquiries about employment opportunities were referred to the proper sources. 
Our offices had personal contact with seme 3^060 newcomers in the past year for 
various tyjDCS of assistance. Among the replies have been those from young 'ladies 
who had come to the United States as domestics under contract to employers <> 
Some of these persons have mutually been dissatisfied. In several cases they had 
come as domestics and had been disappointed in some phase of the work, either not 
enough tjjne off, or more lucrative positions are available so that fulfillment of 
contract, repa^nnent of transportation costs, responsibility of sponsor 'who signed 
the affidavit of support are all matters of discussion and infoimaticn. Yife sent 
letters to ncv/ arrivals asfollov^s; from Boston 9,677; Fall River, 1,191; 
Lawrence^ hh2; Springfield, 79I5 Worcester 99S9 



n 



UBANS 



The Cubans are the latest refugees to add to the list of persons' coming to the 
United States' to escape the conditions prevailing in Cuba. Of the 37,200 in the 
United States, some 25,682 are in Miami. It is estimated that in Massachusetts 
there are over 700, Several voluntary arroncios have programs to assist families 
to settle in this vicinity. \'[e have assisted a number of Cubans to adjust their 
status "to that of permanent residents by the assistance in application for visas in 
Canada© Applications were made, necessary documents sent and appointments made so 
that it viras possible for such persons to go to Canada, get immigrant visas and 
return to the United States for permanent residence. Ihese were the persons who 
had come to the IBiited States with valid passports and vfho had been on visitor or' 
student status and who had necessary documents like birth record, marriage record, 
police clearance, otco Now, since the closing of the Consulate in Cuba, many still 



in possession of passports procured before that time are anxious to join relatives 
in the United Stateso Ihe Departnent of State has established a procedure in^ 
granting waivers of requirements to close relatives to pi^vent family" separation* 
Our office has assisted some fifty persons in application for waiverso Ihe 
Department of State grants the v/aiver of requirements of having the necessary 
papers for admission to the United States and notifies the several airlines and 
the immigration Officials at Miami to permit entry of such persons to the United 
States, Difficulty is being experienced in getting necessary transportation to 
the United States but all is finally accomplished, These persons are then admitted 
on parole status and report to the United States Immigration Service periodically, 
Ihe re have been a number of family reunions in this mannerc, 

In other cases where the Department of State has not deemed it in order to 
grant such waivers, our clients have arranged for the Cubans to enter Jamaica, Vfe 
have assisted them in making the necessary affidavit of support and corresponded 
with the Consul there© A wait for visa to enter Jamaica has followed,, Usually 
the relatives provide necessary expenses of living there and deposit some money in 
the bank for the prospective immigrant© 

There are the -many stories of loss of all property and businosso An elderly 
Polish born couple, residents and citizens of Cuba for many years, with a well 
established business of long standing, came to this vicinity to a citizen daughter 
and were able to adjust status by application under Section 2k^ because of their 
birth place 6 

A Cuban lady with two children had joined her sister in this vicinity as ' 
visitors© VJhen events made it impossible to return to Cuba and to her husband, her 
relatives made the necessary guarantee and we arranged for her to go to Canada to 
get visas for herself and children. Her husband Mas lucky to get to Jamaica, 
Correspondence vath the Consul and execution of affidavits so that after three weeks 
stay in Jamaica the husband was able to get his visa. His letter on arrival to the 
United States which said: "I am one of the Cubans that never made a trip abroad <> 
I always liked the imericans and the United States and thought often how it would 
be in America but never could I dream that it would be as beautiful and the people 
so nice and friendly as I have found it, I really never thought of leaving my 
country forever, but it was impossible to live under CanMunism and am ashamed of 
my fellow citizens that had fallen for the lies of the bear of Fiussia<, I will' 
never forget your' help to make it possible for me to come to the United States, 
Vifithout that help, me and my family could not be enjoying the liberty we enjoy 
today", is only one of the many attestations which come unsolicited to the office 
for service rendered© 

Many Cubans have a good knowledge of English but for many it is a language 
handicap which vjill need to be overcome© Noticeably it has been a group of young 
persons coming from Cuba and, as usual, -hopeful people hoping to return to thoir 
foimer homes. Persons with professions, as doctors, lawyers, etc., find it diffi- 
cult, if not impossible, to get re-established in a new land. However, as long as 
there is tyranny, men will flee from it and refugees continue to cane. 



- u- 



iiSSIST.^CE IN IMIGFu.TION PRQBLEIVIS 

Ihc quota law undor the McCarran Act, although denounced by many iiroigration 
experts and agencies dealing with immigrants, still is in effect and has caused 
many family separations. Legislation was enacted in 1959 to assist family reunions, 
viiich was Public Law 8 6-3 63, permit ted to enter, outside the quota, brothers and 
sisters on the list prior to December 31, 1953 • Such persons could bring their 
spouses and minor children with them* Adult children were not permitted to come 
with their parents, The parents, on arrival in the United States had then to make 
the necessaiy petition and establish third preference category. In many cases, 
the wait for their turn in the quota was still many years, Ihe Italian girl who 
had entered with her parents, in a few years returned to Italy and married her 
fiance hoping to have the husband come soon to the Ifeited Spates, It was indeed 
a hardship on return to find that the husband in this third preference category 
faced a wait of seven years or imtil the vdfe became a citizen of the United States 
in order to come to this country. 

Persons in the second preference, as mothers 'and fathers, in certain countries 
like Greece, llirkey, YJest Indies, to dioose a few, faced a long, long wait of many 
years in the quota. 

In May I961, the Department of State issued a bulletin with infomation of 
registrants waiting their turn to come to the United States and gave the total of 
955,i|8l registrants waiting for visas under a possible l50,000 annual quota, Ihe 
following charts are of interest: 

!• Distribution of Registered Demand by Areas February 1^ 19 6I 

Area of Report Offices Ibtal Unqualified Demand 

Europe It58,l5l 

Near East 208,933 

Western Hemisphere 109:795 

Subquota Areas 72,693 

Soviet Bloc Countries 56^722 

Far East 3^-991 

Africa 13^136 

■R^tal ~955,i4Bl 

!!• Distribution of Registered Demand by Profurences 
'^^ total unqualified registration of 955,ii«l includes the following: 
First preference (skilled technicians) 7 120 

Second preference (parents & unmarried sons and 

daughters of U, S. citizens) - • ' ^ 6,.056 

Ihird preference (Sjx)uses and unmarried sons and daughters 

of lawful pennanent resident aliens) 10 055 

Fourth preference (brothers, sisters and married sons and ' 

daughters of U. S. citizens) l55'099 

Nonpreference (all other quota immigrants) 777^051 

Total ■' 955^ UHl 



-5- 



Italy 


5.666 


Greece 


"^05 


Poland 


6,m3 


Portugal 


ii33 


Chinese Persons 


2D^ 


Jamaica 


100 


lUrkey 


225 



2,376 


l,90h 


133 


6h3 


112 


117 


-21 


l6l 


1,372 


813 


278 


211 


393 


2l;l 



In alditi<:n to the 7,120 first preference applicants applying for vis-.s au 
c<;nsular offices offices abroad, there are 1,707 first preference aj plicants m 
the United States v;ho are applying for adoustoent of status under Section 2k5 of 
the ninmigratLon and Nationality Act, as amended. This total does not include tiie 
spouses and children of these skilled aliens. 

The following is a Hst of the registrants in the following countries with th^ 
heaviest demands for visas: 

/J\fT\fUAL 1st 2nd" 3rd' Uth 

Country QUOm Prefp Prefp fircf> Pref^ Nonpref, Ibtal 

5,U2l4 131,051 119,806 260^560 

808 5,5i;8 9li,891 102;023 

130 3,731; 66,156 70^2[^9 

291+ 3,133 37,9l47 141^856 

^69 9U5 27,241 30^9i;0 

71 620 22,1+75 23^655 

29 ^S6 17,001+ 18,2^ 

Many inquiries and much correspondence, as well as execution of affidavits of 
support to assist the persons to join their relatives in the United States is done 
when their turns are reached. Our statistics show l,l51l petitions executed and 
2,917 affidavits of support « 

Of- course, many of the affidavits of support are for persons coming from 
Ireland, England, Canada v^rhere there is no qiota problem and usually such persons 
with no language problem have come and become assijnilated within a very short time 
in the United States. Vfe assisted persons in executing petitions to send for 
children under the Orphan Program. There have been many inquiries about renewal 
of this law vfhich expires June 30, I96I and it is hopefully expected that this law 
is to be renewed shortly, as well as passage of im-migration legislation to lessen 
the long wait of many close relatives in countries of oversubscribed quotas, where 
so many relatives still wait. It is interesting to note that several mothers, 
fathers and sisters have finally received exit permits to leave the Iron Curtain 
countries such as Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania, and have joined their relatives 
in Massachusetts. 

CmZSMSHIP - NATURALIZ;.^ON ASSISTANCE 

Ihe /vTinual Federal Pteport lists 5,ll+6 persons being naturalized in this State 
in i960, O^r offices assisted 3,099 'of such applications throughout the State, 
On tlie naturalization of the parents, if their children derive citizenship, it has 
been the practice of many of the parents to apply for Certificates of Derivative 
Citizenship for 'these children immediatelye 6kh such applicants were assisted 
during the year, 2l|.8 persons found it advantageous to fill applications for 
Declaration of Intention (first paper) no lon^jer a requirement for naturalization. 
Among them have been newly arrived immigrants joining the United States Aimed 
Forces, Nurses not yet having the residence requirement for naturalization but who 
find this Intention of Citizenship a reqaijrement for the State Registration, as 
well as Doctors seeking license to practice in the Commonwealth, 

- 6 - 



Our booklet «»Questions and Answers in Preparation for the Naturalization 
Examination" of which we distribute 10,000 yiearly has assisted many applicants in 
preparing for the questions examination for the petition of naturalization, Ihis 
year vre have added the Constitution of the United States upon which so many of the 
questions at time of naturalization are based and this will make for a fuller 
understanding of the principles and ideals of our Government, 

This year a number of applicants have been able to get back their citizenship 
rights after appeal to the Board of Review of the Department of State who had 
previously ruled abroad that citizenship had been lost by service of native born 
citizens in foreign araiies. Ihe several cases we assisted with the appeal involved 
native bom citizens who, as small children, accompanied their parents to the 
country of the parent's birth© As is usual, when such persons reached the age for 
corapulsoiy military service, they v/ere drafted into service regardless of their 
claims to United States Citizenship^ ^cse persons had to come to the United 
States as natives of the countries of this residence and military service* Now 
with the "Nishikawa" ruling in regard to loss of citizenship ?/hereby the Government 
has to prove the loss of such citizenship, reversals have been made and citizen- 
ship rights restored in several cases o 

About 10 applicants for naturalization v/ere Philippine born servicemen still 
in the services of the armed forces© Their naturalization involved first their 
attaining an arrival record <, Enlisting abroad in the Philippines they had come to 
the United States for their service o On completion of their enlistment, automati- 
cally their stay in "the United States ended and return to the country of enlist- 
ment was compulsoryo " Now married to United States citizens, they Viranted to remain 
in the United States© Arrangements had to be made and files arranged and appoint- 
ments given for these cases first to go to Canada, get immigrant visas© Then 
having an established entry for residence in the United States and because of their 
usually over five year service in the Navy or Coast Guard, they were able to file 
and get naturalized on return from Canada with the visa© Not only was the right 
of i^erraanent residence accorded "them, regardless of further service, but United 
States Citizenship granted also© 

LEGISIu-.HON 

Ihere have been no nevi laws enacted in immigration or naturalization by the 
Congress this year© Many bills have been introduced, but world situations and 
tensions created in the "Cold V/ar" have the attention of Congress, but it is expeci>- 
ed that some legislation will be enacted for orphans and for reunion of families© 

COOPSmTTVE AGENCY AMD COI\?Ei._SNCE FiuuTICIPATEON 

We continue to have many referrals from private agencies for our assistance 
vdth technical infoimation on citizenship, njranigration and for translation service© 
Contacts vrith agencies working with orphans and refugees are mutually bejrieficial. - 
Participation in conferences of the xlmerican Immigration and Citizenship Conference, 
Conference on Social Integration of Newcomers to the United S+ates, Intorgro^i^P 
Meeting, as well as membership in the Committee to assist the Foreign Born of U.C©Se 



- 7 - 



and work with the teachers groups teaching aliens English and preijaration for 
naturalization have been part of our progrojn. Our relations with the Federal 
Service is mutually beneficial* ¥e have helped many students from colleges and 
high schools with information and materials in their writing of papers in some 
aspect of iramigration or citizenship* 

Ihe present state of World Affairs vri. th 'its Cold Wars, growing unrest, goVv^rn- 
nent upheavals have never been so world vd.de. It has created a problem of refugees 
vjhich covers not only Europeans and particularly the East Berliners, but in ilfrica, 
there are the Algerian and Angolan- refugees. In Asis it is the Arab refugees and 
the many Chinese in H^ng Kong area, are all still a problem for a humanitarian 
world who vd.ll have to render assistance and find a solution. No doubt. United 
States ;d.ll have to be a haven to many. 

A program such as ours "to bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful rela- 
tions the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin" is most important to 
the foreign born subject more than ever to i3ropaganda from nations hostile to 
our democratic foim of government, Massachusetts vdU continue to battle this 
menace © 

YJ'Or^GESIEn OFFICE 

Yfe performed 5^^59 varied services for 3)h07 native and foreign born persons 
fron July 1, i960 to June 30, I96I. 

Monthly statistics reveal that about the same number of clients seek our 
services 'each monlii, vdth the exception of January v/hen our vrorkload is increased 
over 50^» When the aliens register, many :■! them realize that they have completed 
their residence requirements for naturalization, and have been procrastinating 
v;ith applying during the year^ Ihe publicity in the nevfspapers and over the radio 
and television concerning the annual address report, reminds many individuals that 
they have iramigration or americanization problems to be taken care of. 

A nev/spapcr article, at our suggestion, explaining the simplified naturaliza- 
tion program for aliens over 50 years of age on December 2k, 1952 and who had lived 
in the United States for 20 years, also brought on a surprising number, v^ho should 
have been citizens many years ago. ^is group requires moral encouragement in 
their ability to sign their names and being able to ansv/er a few questions about 
the government, 

Ihis' Agent attended the three naturalization hearings at the Superior Court, 
Worcester^ Massachusetts to observe the swearing in ceremonies for the persons v;hom 
the^Worcestcr Office assisted. We have filled out as many as 6 derivative appli- 
cations for one family after the parents received their ovm certificates. 

In February the Agent spoke to the University of Massachusetts Extension 
Evening Class of the problems of Democracy at thel£Llford High School on the topic: 
"Ihe Effects of Lmmigraticn on the United States". After the talk, the students 
asked a multitude of questions concerning the many aspects of immigration on the 
local and national level. 



- 8 - 



It is evident- that Iminigration and Citizenship are still important factors in 
the Worcester area, the CcMmom/ealth, as well as the rest of the c-untry« 

SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

At the close of the fiscal year on June 30, I96I, statistics show that 3,988 
services v;ere performed by the Springfield Office, Biis figure does not record 
the services given by telephone which are urgently demanded of us. For the past 
-three months of the year, the agent was required to maintain the office alone due 
to the fact that the clerk had been granted a leave of absence and because of the 
difficulty 'encountered trjT-ng to obtain a vrorker willing to accept c^nly temporary 
employment o 

Individuals came to us from forty-nine communities in our area and we had 
requests for service from fifty- two former residents of the Commonwealth - some 
novT living in other states and abroad. 

Of the more than fifty nationalities recorded this year, Canadians -we re the 
leading nationality group, They were followed by persons born in Italy, United 
States, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Poland and the British West Indies, 

During the year 791 letters were sent to new immigrants destined to our area. 
Their response and their expression of gratitude for this letter of welcome and 
offer of assistance in adjusting to their new way of life was most gratifying. 

The majority of applications for certificates to prove citizenship were made 
for children bom abroad of /u-nerican bom fathers serving in our armed forces, 

Yfe assisted fourteen persons in preparing applications "bo^ sponsor children 
under -fche Orphans^ Acto Persons were aided in adjusting their status to permanent 
residents with the agent appearing as a representative for one of them before the 
hearing conducted by the Immigration and Naturalization Service in Boston© Some 
of these "cases required requests for waivers because the individuals were exchange 
students* Tfe assisted several others in adjusting their non-immigrant status from 
visitor to s-budent. Many o-bhers were helped wi-bh "bheir preliminary work to obtajji 
appointraents to appear before /imerican Consulates in Canada for the purpose of 
obtaining immigrant visas, A tremendous nimbor of people showed interest in pro—' 
posed changes in the Immigration Law especially as it related to change in qiotas, 
Tbese people were advised to contact their members of Congress, as vrell as their 
S nators to express "bheir desires forsuch a change in law. 

The Distinct Agent attended the final hearings for naturalization at our local 
court. He was one of the participants of the "I am an American Night" program 
sponsored annually by the Springfield School Depar-tanent, He wos invited to bring 
greetings from the Commonwealth as were Governor Volpe and o-bher local officials© 

As the fiscal year came to a close, plans were being made to move our agency 
and other state agencies in the area to a newly constructed building at 235 Chest- 
nut Street, Springfield, ITe have been at our present location for the past 20 
years e The move to Chestnut Street should prove helpful to all people because it 
will, for the first time, have all state a.-;encies centrally located, i\mple parking 
facilities for the public have been a talked of feature for the new location, 

- 9 - 



Our ac^'ncy continues to enjoy the greatest cooperation ■ f municipal, county, 
state, federal and private agencies. 

L/iVfi^NGE OFFICE 

Ihe Lavrrence District Office recorded a total of h,3h2 services to clients 
during the fiscal year ending Jane 30, I96I0 Biis represents an increase of 6I 
services over the previous fiscal yearns total of U,28le 

Forty seven -.perceiit o"f-the services rendered clients during the last fiscal 
year were to residents of Lawrence proper, while 23^ of this office's total ser- 
vices involved Lowell residents o "phis latter figure can be attributed to the fact 
that this Agent is continuing his one day a vreek visits to Lovrcll* ^1 other 
cities and tovms throughout the Commonwealth shared the remaining 30%^ 

Almost one quarter of the total services rendered duiing the last fiscal 
year involved persons of Italian extracticn* Canada had the second largest number 
and native-born Americans were "third o Poland, GrQcce, Portugal and Syria and 
Lebanon v^-ere also well representeda In 'all, individuals born in hi countries vv-erc 
served by the Lawrence Office last year* 

One third of this office's total services during the last fiscal year involved 
the completion of forms and affidavits for clientso Ihe question uppermost in the 
minds of the majoilty of our clients dealt with reunion with relatives still abroad. 
All- too frequently, it was our unpleasant task to inform a client that he could 
not, for example, bring a brother to the United S-^ates due to the severe qiota' 
restrictions© On the other hand, the thanks expressed by grateful clients who, 
through our assistance, were reunited v.ith 'their families always gave us an inmense 
feeling of satisfaction and accomplishment. 

All nevrcomers to this area were welcomed to the United States by a letter from 
this office offering our assistance with whatever problems they may have regarding 
immigration or citizenshipo 

Ihis Agent attended all the naturalization sessions held at the Lawrence 
Superior Court during the last fiscal year^ Apijroximately Qjfo of the new citizens 
naturalized* in Lawrence weire assisted in the completion of their applications by 
this office o 

Me wrote many letters on behalf of clients to government agencies v^rithin the 
United States and' to iunerican officials abroad, /mother service was the transla- 
tion, for clients, of documents written in Italian, A^-abic, French or German, 

"Many individuals came to us witii personal, social, health or employment prob- 
lems «, All vfere interviewed and were referred to the proper resources© 

Excellent cooperation is continuing between this office and the Lav^rrence and 
Lov/ell nev/si^apers and radio stations o They have printed or announced all items 
that we suhnitted to them pertaining to various aspects of the Immigration and 
Nationality Laws© We are also receiving full 'cr operation from the several private, 
city, state and federal agencies in this area, 

- 10 - 



FALL RIVEIt OFFICE 

The Fall lliver Office services thirty-five communities in Southeastern 
Massachusetts v/ith Fall RLver and New Bedford yielding the bulk of the v/ork, Kotv- 
evor, there vrere more than 1,000 clients from other cities and tovvns in this area. 

Total services- given by the Fall River Office for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, I96I v\ras 3,83U as compared to the total of h,h39 ^<'^^ "the previous year. 
The n-^ticeable decrease was applications for naturalization, "petitions for issuance 
of iramicration visa and a slight decline in change of status. The major reason for 
the substantial decrease in applications for naturalization api:)ears that a large 
amount of nev/comers who came under Public La?; 86-363 are not yet eligible for 
nat ur ali z at ion , 

A total of 1,191 newcomer letters ytotq sent out in ih±s southeastern district,' 
The nev/concr letter which is mailed to immigrants is net recorded in our statistics • 
Only those v;ho call cr v/rite to us for information is recorded in those statistics. 
One can easily see' that if these newcomer letters w^re recrrded ^ur services vrould 
exceed more than 5^000 during the fiscal yer^r. 

As usual. Fall River leads the list cf clients served vdth the City of Nov/ 
Bedford ranking second. The District iigont visits New Bedford one day a week 
and usually encounters a hea\iy workload fer that single day. Since the closing of 
the Federal Office in Now Bedford in 1955^ numerous technical problems arise and are 
brought to us for decisi n. This office alsc har assisted in being a guidrjice to 
the newcoracr and alien v/ith reference' to adult oducatic n, social security, obtain- 
ing birth, marriage and death recoixis, ac::^pticns rnd ; ublic welfare service, 

VJhilc services appear to be somewhat smaller than the past fiscal year, it 
must be remembered that n: new immigration legislati -n vfas in effect, rlcvrovor, 
the problems in this area are just as technical and acute as they ever were due 
to the nationality makeup, namely Portuguese, who have a small qu^ta of L3^S per 
annum. The statistics cf immigration quotas arc closely scrutinized in ■ rler that 
the alien* s 'f am ly may be united under second, third -- r fourth preference as socn 
as possible. 

Pending legislati' >n has as eagerly hoped for, many of the clients who as non- 
citizens av/ait *reuni'-n with their spouses or children awriting third preference 
category visas, Ihe impact ^^f these third prjferencc applications shows they v/erc 
approximately 7 J years behind on the quota vraitinr list. 

With the evcrchanging tines, the office ;f tl:ie Divisi^-n is unquesticnably a 
necessary service for the citizens and the residents rf this area, ' 



- 11 - 



> 

S' 

For All Offices 

For fiscal year enciing 6/30/6I 

I, INFORmiTON 


CO 

s 

ATISTICAL 
Services 

7717 


1 

DETAIL 
liven 

1937 


8 

2157 


9 

M 
fan 

M 

g 

CO 

2157 


g 
8 

3569 


CO 
vA 
■^ 


17,537 


1« Booklets, forms, blanks 


1371 


276 


62 


316 


337 


2;362 


2, Citizen ship 


B92 


826 


59U 


790 


1029 


liil31 


3» Immigration 


h9^^ 


626 


1276 


781; 


1320 


8^959 


ii» Travel 


n 


hi 


151 


2U0 


8i;5 


1,371; 


5« Other 


uio 


162 


Ih 


27 


38 


711 


II. FORMS FILLED 


6885 


75U 


1078 


726 


1051 


10, 1;9l4 


6; 1-1^85 Registry 


36 


5 


7 


k 


7 


59 


7. I-U«5 Sec«2U5 


2U3 


Ik 


15 


19 


12 


303 


b. W-.3OO 


IbU 


10 


11 


21 


22 


2U8 


9. N-UOO 


1961 


226 


15b 


209 


257 


2811 


10. N-.U02 


132 


33 


2 


l-k 


17 


198 


11. N-600 


U16 


5ii 


32 


65 


77 


61;!; 


12. N-505 


12h 


8 


2 


7 


6 


Ikl 


13 • Other "Natur. Forms 


168 


20 


27 


3k 


26 


275 


lU. 1-600 


10 


- 


2 


- 


- 


12 


11?. 1-130 


808 


lOU 


'^? 


63 


103 


II5I; 


lb. 1-131 


113 


11 


6 


7 


20 


157 


1/'. Other Ijiimigo Forms 


1217 


132 


190 


i;9 


212 


1800 


18. AR-n 


213 


11 


81 


82 


^^ 


1;1;5 


19 * 1-90 


m 


20 


19 


kl 


30 


3Sk 


■^Ue, I-!?3 


1022 


106 


U50 


105 


201; 


1887 


III. EXECU'HON OF AFFIDAVITS 


272i| 


hZk 


368 


320 


333 


1|,169 


21« Affidavit of Support 


2293 


lilU 


116 


132 


232 


2917 


2^e .\ffidavit of Facts 


by 


3 


2U 


3 


Ik 


132 


ii3. Certificate of Identity 


bO 


- 


2 


2 


2 


86 


2k* Other notarial 


263 


211 


226 


183 


85 


1031; 


IV. OH-IER SERVICES 


8i;28 


kSe 


621 


201 


1;60 


10,166 


25. Change of Status (Cards) 


355 


39 


29 


28 


19 


170 


260 Appearance at Hearings 


202 


8 


2 


1 


6 


-219 


27. Interpretation & Trans, 


1263 


16 


152 


- 


188 


l;619 


28; letters 


657U 


360 


ii37 


172 


2l;6 


7,789 


Z9. Other 


3h 


33 


1 


- 


1 


69 


V, INTERVlElff 


19 h9 


263 


118 


581i 


ll;6 


3,060 


30. Newcomer Interview 


19h9 


263 


118 


581; 


ll;6 


3,060 


TO T A L S 


21,103 


3,83li 


li,3U2 


3,988 


S,SS9 


l;5,ii26 



1. 

2. 

3. 
h. 

6. 

n 

I • 

8„ 

9. 
10, 

lU 
12. 

13, 

Ih. 

1^. 
16. 

17. 

18 „ 

19. 

20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 

25o 

27o 
26. 

29. 
30o 
31. 
32 c 
33. 
31;. 

3S. 
36, 

37. 
38. 
39, 
iiO« 
Ul. 
U2. 
43. 
U1+. 

45. 

46. 

47. 

48. 

49. 

52. 

53. 
5Ii. 
55. 
56. 

57. 



7/V6O Nationality and Ethnio Statistics 6/30/ 


^31 

vTOR- 
Cilio liji'i. 






BOSTON 


FAT,T, 
RIVEit 


LaVJIENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


'ir''ii\L 


Albania 


91 


2 


mm 


^m 


87 


loo 


Ai'zaca 


107 


1 


18 


k 


7 


137 


Aniienia(R,orT«) 


23 


» 


103 


.- 


17 U 


300 


Aus trail a 


U7 


«- 


- 


- 


k 


5T 


Austria 


lUh 


28 


31 


28 


9 


21;0 


Beigium 


«0 


- 


12 


17 


18 


127 


Jisuigaria 


59 


- 


- 


2 


, ...^ 


65 


uanada 


3262 


166 


569 


599 


583 


5179 


uentral America 


517 


31 


20 


23 


3 


5^i,. 


China 


U77 


lib 


kh 


16 


71 


73c 


Cuba 


555 


— 


Mm 


— 


- 


555 


Czechoslovakia 


68 


2 


12 


1 


12 


101 


JJenmark 


3k 


6 


2 


1 


11 




Jtiigypt 


96 


12 


25 


9 


22 


l^.i; 


Estonia 


2k 


- 


1 


- 


28 


53 


l''iiilancl 


59 


— 


- 


8 


ol 


128 


l^'rance 


340 


23 


66 


UO 


106 




(ieiTTiany 


1062 


88 


168 


315 


189 


1J22 


(ireat ijritain 


ai5 


120 


13^ 


306 


225 


1600 


Greece 


1281; 


58 


i 306 


237 


183 


20^8 


hungary 


277 


k 


32 


15 


30 


35>'^ 


Iceland 


5 


~ 


- 


1 


8 


IL 


maia 


152 


10 


43 


— 


37 


2[i? 


maonesia 


50 


- 


9 


8 


12 


79 


Iran 


109 


7 


10 


- 


k 


130 


Iraq 


17 


k 


1 


3 


3 




ire lana 


1697 


9 


^ 70 


292 


206 


■ 2271;. 


Israel 


60 


k 


3 


2 


33 


102 


Italy 


6267 


83 


1023 


573 


1218 


916II- 


(japan 


79 


17 


5 


66 


56 


223 


Jordan 


26 




"" 


11; 


27 


67 


Korea 


122 


9 


8 


7 


17 


163 


Latvia 


191; 


i 


1 


13 


3 


212- 


Litnuania 


l;55 


- 


57 


k 


175 


691 


Mexico 


79 


- 


6 


1 


9 


95 


JMetnerlands 


121 


5 


6 


20 


17 


169 


iMew Zealand 


21 




6 


— 


7 


3k 


Norway 


57 


10^ ; 


■- 


6 


21 


187 


Jr'ajCLStan 


15 


- 


11; 


— 


7 


36 


I'aiestine 


2k 


— 


26 


k 


2 


56 


rniuppmes 


191 


33 


16 


18 


7 


265 


loiana 


1320 


152 


33k 


238 


583 


2627 


i^ortiigai 


^k3 


1987 


265 


107 


29 


3231 


rcujnania 


63 


— 


k 


1 


7 


75 


iboutn Mie-'ica 


607 


16 


6 


1;2 


61 


732 


OpdJLIl 


127 


7 


7 


6 


8 


155 


owe uen 


81 


11 


- 


15 


81; 


191 


vMi. t z e r 1 and 


51 


3 


— 


2 




56 


tiyria & Lebanon 


185 


k3 


250 


^9 


61 


^9i 


iUTKey^MOG Armenia) 

T\^T £:i c? 4* /-\ " " 


226 


- 


16 


31 


^9 


332 


ipies ue 


1 


- 


— 


~ 




1 


UKrame 

TT Q q n ~~ ~~ 


k9 


10 


1 


7 


— 


67 


u »o»o»i;i,<j 


kk3 


19 


37 


73 


33 


605 


uniteo. btates 


3k6l 


639 


51;7 


1;69 


831 


59 17 


vveo i< IIHIISS 


lis 


— 


21 


206 


5k 


1056 


lugosiavia 


203 


3 


1 


18 


kk 


269 


uuner uountries 


- 106 


- 


' 6 


- kS 


' 9 


'166 


■L w I A L 


27,703 


3,831; 


k.3k2 


3,988 


5.559 ( 


/I5.1I26 



Fiscal Year Ending 6/30 /< 


1 

31 O 

L C 


1 

1-9 
(—1 

a 

C A L I 


1 

O 

TIES 


Q 

g 
M 

'?^ 
Ph 

CO 


g 


E--. 
O 


Abington 


21; 


•- 


,„ 


2k 


Acton 


3$ 


- 


«- 


— 


— 


35 


Acushnet 


- 


:i^ 


- 


— 


" 


12 


Ad^ans 


26 


mm 


— 


2 


— 


2'(j 


Agawam 


1 


— 


'- 


7a 


— 


79 


Amesbuiy 


6 


- 


9 


— 


— 


15 


Amherst 


1 


6 


- 


26 


- 


33 


Andover 


3 


~ 


133 


— 


- 


136 


Arlington 


3^6 


- 


2 


— 


— 


35ci 


ilshbiirnham 


1 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


Ashby 


1 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


Ashfield 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Ashland 


10 


- 


— 


- 


- 


10 


Athol 


— 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Attlebo2Xi 


22 


119 


- 


- 




lUl 


Auburn 


1 


- 


- 


- 


lib 


119 


Avon 


9 


- 


- 


— 


— 


9 


Ayer 


119 


— 


17 


- 


2 


13o 


Bai-ns table 


21 


9 


mm 


^^ 


.. 


30 


Bar re 


- 


- 


cmm 


- 


3 




BedTord 


62 


- 


- 


- 




62 


BelchertoYJTi 


1 


- 


- 


3 


— 


ii 


Bellinghaa 


10 


- 


- 


— 


— 


10 


Belniont 


201 


— 


— 


- 


— 


201 


Berkley 


?. 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Berlin 


- 


- 


- 


— 


h 


i; 


Beverly 


127 


- 


1 


- 


- 


12b 


Billerica 


19 


- 


5 


- 


- 


2U 


Blacks tone 


13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Blandiord 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 


1 


Bolton 


' - 


- 


- 


— 


10 


"10 


Boston 


12,16U 


&^ 


91 


5 


~ 


12,260 


Bourne 


1^ 


12 ' 


- 


'- 


- 


30 


Boxborough 


2 


- 


- 


— 


- 


2 


Boxl'ord 


— 


~ 


13 


- 


- 


13 


Boylston 


1 


- 


- 


- 


36 


37 


Braintree 


59 


- 


i" ' • 


~ 


- 


59 


Breves ter 


~ 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Bridgewater 


55 





- 


- 


- 


!^B 


Brimlield 


! 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Brockton 


nh 


9 


- 


- 


*-■ 


183 


Brookiield 


1 


— 


- 


— 


- 


1 


Brookline 


935 


- 


6 


jL 


- 


9U2 


tJur.il.ngton 


22 


~ 


1 


1 


- 


23' 



Cambridge 


B 

CO 

s 

1896 


6 


1 


9 

— i 

s 

en 


1 



Eh 

1902 


Canton 


51 


- 


- 


— 


- 


51 


Carlisle 


2 


- 


- 


- 


— 


2 


Carver 


1 


- 


- 


-- 


— 


1 


Charlton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


1^ 


Chatham 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Chelmsford 


h 


- 


18 


- 


- 


22 


Chelsea 


33^ 


«- 


» 


- 


- 


338 


Chester 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


5 


Chic ope e 


26 


- 


- 


Ud7 


- 


513 


CUnton 


h 


- 


- 


- 


83 


87 


Gohassei 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Uoncord 


SO 


«- 


- 


~ 


- 


50 


Conway 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Danvers 


28 


^ ^ 


10 




,^ 


38 


Dartmouth 


2 


102 


- 




- 


lOU 


uedham 


I2B 


- 


i 


- 


- 


133 


Ueeri'ie'ld 


- 


- 


— 


2 


- 


2 


bennis 


2 


- 




- 


- 


2 


iJignton 


— 


9 


— 


- 


- 


Q 


Douglas 


— 


- 




- 


^ 


2 


Dover 


19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19 


Dracut 


1 


_ 


lib 


- 


«- 


U9 


Duaiey 


3 


■" 


- 


- 


ii5 


UB 


JiiDCDuiy 


^h 




— 


— 


- 


2i4 


East Brookfield 


«M 




^ 


_ 


1 


1 


East Longmeadow 


- 


— 


- 


36 


- 


36 


£j as Tin am 


2 


- 


- 


— 


— 


2 


Eastnampion 


5 


- 


- 


13 


- 


18 


E as ton 


12 


- 


- 


- 


— 


12 


ii'ssex 


10 


- 


— 


— 


- 


10 


iiverett 


li7^ 


~ 


2 


— 


- 


U75 


Fairhaven 


5 


78 


^ 






83 


l-'ail Kiver 


3U 


I92I; 


«*• 


— 


1 


1959 


Falmouth 


la 


66 


•w 


- 


- 


107 


r itchDurg 


32 


- 


— 


- 


30 


62 


Foxborough 


16 


^ 


— 


•>. 


— 


26 


Framjignam 


222 


- 


1 


— 


3 


226 


iraiiklin 


Ud 


- 


— 


-. 


^ 


m" 


r x-^etov/n 


- 


9 


— 


— 


~ 


... .^ 


Gaixlner 


8 








70 


78 


(jeorgetovm 


s 


- 


I 


— 




^ 


(jrloucester 


5d 


- 


- 


— 


~ 


■ 58 


Lii'cu ton 


5 


- 


— 


- 


93 


9^ 


liranby 


— 


- 


- 


7 


- 


7 



,.~f- 



Granville 


1 


fin 




9 

1 

R 

Pu. 

CO 

1 




O 

Eh 

1 


Great Barrihgton 


1 


- 


- 




- 


12 


GreenliGld 


9 


- 




h 


- 


13 


Groton 


li4 


- 


2 


- 


- 


16 


Groveland 


3 


»■« 


19 




-. 


22 


Hadley 


1 


^„ 




1 


^ 


2 


Halil'ax 


h 


— 


- 


- 


- 


U 


Hamilton 


18 


~ 


3 


- 


- 


21 


Hampden 


- 


«M 


- 


h 


- 


h 


Hanover 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Hanson 


B 


- 


— 


- 


MM 


o 


Haitlwick 


- 




- 


••• 


3 


3 


Harvard 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Harwich 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Hatlield 


- 


•m 


- 


h 


- 


ii 


Haverhill ' 


2i| 


M» 


2b6 


~ 


- 


310 


Hingham 


29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


Holbrook 


50 


- 


2 


- 


~ 


52 


Holden 


5 


- 


- 


— 


93 


95 


Hollist'on 


7 


- 


- 




- 


7 


Holyoke 


5 


- 


- 


30U 


- 


309 


Hope dale 


3 


- 


- 


- 


1 


ii 


hopid-nton 


2 


- 


— 


•^ 


7 


9 


Hudson 


h^ 


- 


Kwm 


2 


5 


52 


H1UJ. 


61 


- 


- 


- 


*" 


61 


Ipswich 


1;5 


mm 


3 


_ 




1|8 


Lancaster 


65 


^ ^ 


^^ 


, 


30 


95 


Lanes borough 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Lawrence 


21 


- 


20^1; 


- 


1 


ab?6 


i^e 


1 


mm 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Leicester, 


- 


~ 


«. 


- 


63 


63 


Leominster 


lb 


- 


- 


- 


3i^ 


52 


Lexington 


333 


- 


1 


- 




13U 


iaiicoln 


25 


- 


- 


- 




25 


Jj.ttleton 


6 


- 


- 


- 




6 


Longmeadovf 


- 


- 


— 


U6 


— 


li6 


Lowell 


93 


- 


99^ 


— 


2 


1090 


LUdlOW 


- 


- 


- 


97 




97 


Lynn 


593 


- 


— 


— 


1 


^9h 


Lynniieid 


b 


^m 


- 


— 


— 


'6 


Maiden 


383 


M» 


2 






3G5 


Manchester 


12 


•K» 


« 


- 


— 


12 


Mansiield 


52 


b 


- 


- 


1 


61 


Mai'u±eneaci 


69 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


69 


Marion 


- 


9 


- 


- 


— 


9 



> 

Granville 


CO 

g 


s 


8 
3 


9 

g 

CO 

1 




O 

Eh 

1 


Great Barring ton 


1 


- 


- 


q 

^ 


mm 


12 


Qreenliold ' ' 


9 


■M* 


- 


h 


~ 


-y^ 


Groton 


li4 


- 


2 


- 


- 


16 


Groveland 


3 


- 


19 


- 


- 


22 


Had ley 


1 


_ 




1 


^, 


2 


Halil'ax 


U 


- 


- 


- 


- 


l4 


Hamilton 


lb 




3 


- 


- 


21 


Hampden 


- 


- 


- 


h 


- 


h 


Hanover 


9 


- 


- 


~ 


- 


9 


Hanson 


b 


- 


- 


- 


- 





Hardwick 


- 




- 


- 


3 


3 


Harvard 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Harwich 


1 


*- 


— 


- 


- 


1 


Hatfield 


- 


- 


- 


h 


- 


li 


Haverhill' ' 


2h 


•M 


286 


— 


- 


310 


Hingham 


29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


Holbrook 


50 


~ 


2 


- 


- 


52 


hoiden 


^ 


-. 


~ 


— 


93 


9S 


Holliston 


Y 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Holyoke 


5 


- 


- 


30U 


- 


309 


Hope dale 


3 


« 


— 


- 


1 


U 


hopKinton 


2 


- 




m=m 


? ' 


9 


Hudson 


k^ 


«> 


«»• 


2 


5 


52 


mil 


61 


- 


*i« 


— 


- 


61 


Ipswich 


h$ 


•m 


3 


„ 


•»• 


liO 


Lancaster 


65 


_ 


_ 


_ 


30 


95 


Lanes Dor ough 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Lawrence 


21 


- 


205i; 


- 


1 


2'076 


we 


1 


- 


- 


- 


■ 


1 


Leicester, 


— 


- 


-. 


- 


63 


63 


Leominster 


lb 


- 


- 


- 


3h 


52 


Lexington 


333 


- 


1 


- 




13U 


ioncom 


25 


- 


- 


- 




25 


Littleton 


6 


- 


- 


— 


~ 


6 


LongmeadoVi"- 


- 


- 


— 


U6 


«• 


ii6 


Lowe 11 


93 


- 


995 


~ 


2 


1090 


LUdlOW 


- 


- 


- 


97 


- 


97 


Lynn 


593 


- 


— 


- 


1 


^9\x 


Lynniield 


b 


- 


- 


- 


- 


■6 


Maiden 


383 


mm 


2 






3G5 


Manchester 


12 


mM 


•n* 


-. 


— 


12 


Mansiieid 


52 


b 


— 


— 


1 


61 


MarD±enead 


69 


~ 


- 


- 


~ 


69 


Marion 


- 


9 


- 


- 


— 


9 



i 

Marlborough 


1 

52 


FALLBIVER 

1 


1 


1 SPRINGFIETD 


i 

17 


Eh 
O 

69 


Marshfield 


22 


<~ 


- 


- 


- 


22 


Mattapoisett 


— 


10 


tM 


- 


- 


10 


Maynard 


56 


- 


■M 


- 


- 


36 


Medi'ield 


50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


50 


Medford 


550 


- 


6 


- 


- 


556 


Medv^ay 


h3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


U3 


Melrose 


95 


- 


2 


- 


3 


100 


Merrimac 


- 


- 


l4 


- 


- 


1; 


Methuen 


3B 


-- 


315 


- 


— 


353 


Middleborough 


Uo 


3 


- 


— 


- 


i;3 


Middle ton 


21 


- 


1 


- 


- 


22 


Milford 


30 


- 


- 


- 


89 


119 


Millb-ury 


- 


- 


- 


- 


«2 


«2 


Millis 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Milton 


2lh 


- 


- 


- 


- 


IIU 


Monson 


1 


- 


- 


h 


- 


5 


Montague 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


3 


Nahant 


38 


^^ 


•M 


■M 


^^ 


38 


Nantucket 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Natick 


:.i6 


^ 


- 


- 


1 


117 


Needham 


113 


•^ 


1 


- 


- 


nil 


New Bedford 


75 


918 




- 


- 


993 


New Braintree 


- 


^m 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Newbury 


15 


- 


5 


- 


- 


20 


Newburyport 


15 


- 


IS 




- 


27 


Newton 


767 


a»i« 


10 


- 


- 


797 


Norfolk 


2 




- 


- 


mm 


2 


North Adams 


6 


- 


- 


6 


- 


12 


North Andover 


6 


- 


81 


- 


3 


90 


North Attleborough 


Iti 


Oil 


- 


- 


- 


32 


wortn Brookfield 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


wortn Heading 


1 


- 


3 


- 


- 


i; 


iNorthampton 


13 


- 


- 


35 


- 


ii8 


JNiorthborough 


13 


- 


- 


- 


1;9 


62 


Northbridge 


1 


- 


- 


- 


12 


13 


Wort on 


5 


«- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Norwell 


U 


- 


<H> 


- 


- 


ii 


Norwood 


172 


- 


- 


- 


1 


173 


Oxford 


_ 


^^ 


^^ 


_ 


h3 


1^3 


Palmer 


8 


mm 


_ 


la 


3 


52 


Faxton 


3 


»r3 


- 


- 


2h 


27 


Peabody 


96 


- 


2 


- 


«M 


100 


Pembroke 


2 


- 


- 


— 


— 


2 


Pepperell 


9 


- 


- 


— 


— 


9 


Petersham 


1 1 


- 


UM 


- 


1 


2 



> 

Pittsfield 


_ BOSTON 

VO 


> 


S 
^ 


9 

H 

ft; 
26 


O 

8 


hS 


Plednville 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Plymouth 


38 


- 


- 


- 


- 


38 


Plympton 


^ 


•m 


- 


- 


-. 


2 


Princeton 


- 


- 


«M 


— 


1 


1 


Qiiincy 


570 


^^ 


,_, 


T-, 


3 


573 


Randolph 


53 


_ 


mm 


^ 


*w» 


53 


Raynham 


- 


10 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Reading 


U2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


Ul4 


Rehoboth 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Revere 


256 


- 


- 


- 


2 


258 


Rockland 


Ih 


9 


•>• 


- 


- 


23 


Rockport 


3 


- 


2 


- 


- 


5 


Rowley- 


3 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Russell 


2 


- 


- 


^ 


- 


U 


Rutland 


- 


- 


«■■ 


- 


31 


31 


Salem 


138 


^ 


2 




— 


lUo 


Salisbury 


h 


- 


12 


- 


- 


16 


Saugus 


99 


- 


- 


- 


- 


99 


Scituate 


93 


— 


— 


- 


- 


93 


Seekonk 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Sharon 


10 


- 


— 


- 


- 


10 


ShelTield 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


6' 


aneiburne 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Sherborn 


1 


#«■ 


- 


- 


— 


1 


bniriey 


11 


- 


3 


- 


- 


li4 


Shrewsbury 


10 


- 


- 


- 


173 


183 


Shut es bury 


- 


- 


- 


1 


~ 


1 


Somerset 


1 


179 


- 


- 


— 


180 


Some rvi lie 


11U9 


— 


9 


- 


k 


ll62 


South Hadley 


— 


- 


- 


31 


- 


n 


Southborough 


h 


- 


- 


- 


7 


11 


souiinbndge 


16 


- 


- 


2 


115 


133 


sou-onwick 


- 


- 


- 


11 


- 


11 


Spencer 


2 


- 


« 


- 


m 


50 


bpnngiield 


U5 


- 


1 


2367 


- 


^taS' 


Sterling 


- 


- 


- 


•M 


3 


3 


Stockbridge 


- 


- 


1 


3 


~ 


h 


stonenam 


95 


- 




- 


- 


95 


Stoughton 


51 


5 


- 


-i ^ 


- 


56' 


Stur bridge 


3 


- 


- 


- 


7 


10 


Sudbury 


15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


Sutton 


2 


- 


- 


— 


2 


h 


S^ir/ampscott 


hX 


- 


- 


~ 


- 


ki 


Swansea 


1 


92 


- 


- 


_ .."". ... , 


93 



> 

Taimton 


CO 

g 

11 


i 

12li 


o 


SPRINGFIELD 

I 


YiTORCESTER 

I 


135 


Ifempleton 


h 


- 


- 


- 


- 


h 


Ifewskbuiy 


^ 


- 


9 


- 


- 


lU 


Ibwnsend 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Ii*-uro 


^ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


lyngsborough 


h 


- 


i| 


- 


- 


« 


l^ton 


^ 


^^ 


_ 


^^ 


21 


21 


Uxbridge 


- 


- 


- 


- 


b 


b 


Wakefield 


86 


mm 


13 




_ 


99 


Walpole 


27 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27 


Waltham 


U99 


- 


5 


». 


2 


506 


Ware 


- 


CMtl 


OM 


11 


7 


lb 


ViTareham 


15 


9 


- 


=- 


"" 


21; 


Warren 


1 


-. 


9mr, 


3 


10 


111 


Vfetertovm 


5oB 


- 


- 


- 


i4 


512 


Wayiand 


35 


«^ 


- 


- 


- 


36 


Vfebster 


2 


- 


- 


~ 


107 


109 


We lies ley 


113 


•« 


~ 


— 


- 


113 


Vifelll'leet" ' 


1 


10 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Wenham 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


i/Yest Boylston 


- 


mm 


- 


- 


73 


73 


West Brookfield 


- 


1 


- 


-. 


3 


3 


west Springl-ield 


- 


1 _ 


- 


i33 


mm 


133 


Vifestborough 


11 




- 




2b 


39 


WestliGld 


- 


- 




69 


- 


69 


'.Vestl'ord 


1 


Cva 


5 


- 


"- 


6 


Weston 


38 


- 


— 


- 


- 


38 


Westport 


- 


55 


- 


- 


- 


55 


Vfestwood 


2U 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2U 


Weymouth 


10^ 


! 

1 


- 


"" 


- 


105 


Whitman 


1« 


1 


- 


.,-, 


- 


l8 


Wilbraham 


1 


« 


- 


33 


- 


31; 


m. IJiamsbiirg 


- 


- 


- 


2 


~ 


2 


winning ton 


h^ 


3 


3 


- 


- 


51 


winchendon 


- 


- 


- 


' 


1 


1 


Winchester 


69 


— 


— 


1 .. ■ 


— 


69 


Winthrop 


b7 


„ 


— 


~. 


- 


87 


wobiirn 


151 


^ 


2 


- 


— 


153 


Worcester 


92 


Kri 


- 


5 


3785 


3bb2 


wrentham 


19 


- 


- 


•■• 


— 


19 


Yarmouth 


1 


3 


^^ 


. 




k 


Out of State 


37h 


.^ 


9h 


52 


17 


537 


Ibtals 


27,703 


3,831; 


U53l;2 


3,988 


^,S^9 


1;5,1;26 











PitJ^f 






■^ c ^